Afghanistan

My life in the decade of war: Rep. Lynn Woolsey

When the war in Afghanistan began ten years ago this week, four of my five grandchildren weren’t even born yet. The US has now been at war for their entire lives. Over that time, I have given more than 400 speeches on the floor of the US Congress calling for our costly and counterproductive wars to end.

Please help me send the message that we need to end these wars. Share the story of your life in the decade of war.

As committed supporters of peace, you understand the devastating cost of the wars to our troops, Afghans and Iraqis, and the millions of Americans who suffer because of cuts to social programs to fund the wars.  My allies in Congress and I will continue to push for a responsible, quick withdrawal from Iraq and Afghanistan, but we need your voices to make that fight successful.

Join me in standing up to end these wars by sharing your story and showing the media, the public and Congress that ten years of war is ten too many.

Next year I will finish my last term in the United States Congress. I am proud of the work we have done over the last decade to end these needless wars, and impressed and inspired by the commitment of people like you who help make that work possible.

We have made great progress in building support for ending these wars and investing in smarter security. However, there is still much work to be done, and we must redouble our efforts and show we will not rest until all our troops come home.  Add your voice to this call by sharing your story of the decade of war.

I look forward to working with you to make sure my grandchildren and our future generations can know a time when their country is not at war.

1 reply »

  1. The USA has been at war ever since my little boy was born 8 years ago. As a parent that brought her only child into this world at age 42, and whose husband was brave and wise enough to be a conscientious objector back in 1973 at the tender age of 19, I see firsthand what these costly wars are doing to our nation. My son is lucky enough to go to a really good public school (very involved parents, tucked up in upscale hills of SF Bay with parents that give school lots of money, highest API scores in district-entire area, very strict discipline, top students. Yet, parents need to bring in all basic school supplies since they are cut from budget. Isn’t it sad? We spend how much on these wars?